Chinchilla

Breed: Chinchilla
Description: The Angora has been used successfully in the make up of the chinchilla, giving the coat its full density. It has also produced some bad faults, the most common of which is the appearance of woolly coats. Light-colored cheeks are also a direct result of the Angora introduction, as is a too large white area at the nape of the neck. Having barred feet is faulted.


Description: The Angora has been used successfully in the make up of the chinchilla, giving the coat its full density. It has also produced some bad faults, the most common of which is the appearance of woolly coats. Light-colored cheeks are also a direct result of the Angora introduction, as is a too large white area at the nape of the neck. Having barred feet is faulted.

The chinchilla was one of the very first really important fur breeds. Like many other fur breeds, it came from France.

The French rabbit breeder Mssr. M.J. Dybowski is credited with producing this beautiful rabbit. The actual production claims of this man have always been in some doubt. One theory is that the chin, as it is more often called, came from Serbia and that Mssr. Dybowski merely improved on it and popularized the breed.

However, the popular theory is that Mssr. Dybowski crossed a wild rabbit with a blue Beveren and a Himalayan. The litters from the Himalayan doe and the Beveren doe were interbred and by a process of selection the early chin was produced. These early chins were very heavy-boned, similar to the giant breeds. The color of these rabbits was generally very poor. A black tan was used to try to improve the ticking and as a result other breeds were produced including the Siamese and marten sables.

In April, 1913, the chinchilla was exhibited for the first time and later that year it was given the “prize of honor” at the big show in Paris. When the first chinchillas came to England, they caused quite a sensation. A silver cup was offered for the best chin at an English show. The price for good quality furs went sky high. The chin appeared in America in 1919, where it caused just as much of a sensation.

The main attribute of this popular breed is, of course, the color and pattern of the pelt, which closely resembles that of the much prized pelt of the true wild chinchilla. The undercolor of the fur should be slate blue at the base, the middle portion pearl gray merging into white and tipped with black. It should be noted that the slate blue base should be wider than the pearl portion. The whole of the pelt should be ticked with long black guard hairs that may be wavy or even.

Generally the flanks and chest are slightly lighter colored than the back; the neck is just a shade lighter than the chest and flanks. The triangle at the nape of the neck is light pearl gray as are the eye circles. The ears are laced with black. The belly and underside of the tail are white with a slate blue undercolor.

There are many arguments as to the correct chinchilla color. Some are obviously much too dark and some much too light. These arguments, along with those regarding pearling, are very complicated.

The texture of the fur is of prime importance. Without good texture, the color and pearling will be of inferior quality. The fur should be soft and dense; by no means should it be flyback nor should it be too long.

Although adult chinchilla rabbits can weigh 5’/z to 63/4 lbs., the standard calls for fine bone. In this respect, many rabbits fail.